From the tiniest mosses to the towering oaks,  plants are important and unique to Wisconsin ecosystems.

Forest Plant
Flora
Check our some great ways to discover the beauty and importance of flowers in our area.
Tree
Trees have importance culturally, economically, and historically. Get up-close and personal with the megaflora of our state.
American Black currant
The black currant is a shrub with maple-like leaves with toothed edges.
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Female arrowhead plant
The leaves of this plant give its name away.
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Tree tops with Balsam Fir
Balsams are used by people for many products, especially holiday trees.
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Big Bluestem with blue sky
Imagine grass reaching as high as 12 feet.
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A black spruce in a bog
Needles of the black spruce are blue-green, short, and pointed.
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Blazing Star in bloom
No, this is not something you'll find in the sky.
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Blooming bloodroot
Any guesses how this plant got its name?
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Bunchberry with berries
In the fall, the bunchberry lives up to its name.
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Close up of cattail
This wetland plant is very common to Wisconsin's marshes, ponds, ditches, rivers and lakes.
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Compass plant against a blue sky
Where did this plant get such a name?
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Bats flying
One person's creepy critter is another person's favorite animal.....
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Dune Thistle in sand
Wisconsin Status: ThreatenedFederal Status: Threatened
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Close up of Dutchman's breeches
What do these flowers look like to you?
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Eastern Red Cedar
People use this tree for woodwork in their homes, hope chests, closets, for lead pencils, posts, and poles.
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Eastern White Pine  Tree isolated on white background
The Eastern White Pine can grow to be 100 feet tall.
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Water-milfoil plants in water
Preventing milfoil from reaching a lake or spreading is extremely important.
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A forest of old spruce, fir and pine trees
Evergreen trees give us vibrant green color in winter when the rest of the world has turned brown
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Garlic Mustard
No—It's not something you put on your sandwich
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Arbor Day
Arbor Day is the last Friday in April each year.
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Close up of Eastern Hemlock needles
This conifer grows high in the sky, 60-100 feet.
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Hepatica
This plant gets its name from the Latin word for liver, hepaticus.
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Indian Grass
This grass can grow taller than you, measuring 3 to 10 feet tall.
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Indigo flower
Why would a beautiful white flowering prairie plant have a name that is a shade of blue?
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Space view of earth
Did you know that milkweed can indicate ozone pollution?
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Young jack pine tree
The jack pine is unique because its resinous cones open and release seeds during a fire or from an intense, hot sun.
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Forest with white trillium in blossom
The trillium gets its name from the Latin word for three.
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Close up of leafy spurge
Leafy spurge is considered a noxious weed under Wisconsin law.
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Little bluestem plant
Look for bluestem in the winter with fuzzy white seeds which small birds love to feed on.
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Tapped maple tree with little boy holding a bucket
Those Marvelous Maples
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March Marigold, Image Credit: Thomas Meyer
Another plant of wet places is the marsh marigold.
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Milkweed plant
Can you guess where the Milkweed plant got its name from?
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Northern White Cedar stands against a white background, while a little bit of grass surrounds its base
The Northern White Cedar is easy to identify. It grows nearly everywhere in Wisconsin, except the southwest.
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Paper Birch trees
In the winter, birch are also easy to identify by the dangling flower clusters in small bunches.
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Pasqueflower
The first prairie flower to bloom is the pasqueflower.
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Close up of Prairie Coneflower
This delicate yellow coneflower stands between 2 and 5 feet tall.
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Prairie Dock plant
Not to be mistaken for the sunflower or the compass plant.
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White Orchid
Before wet meadows and moist prairies were drained and tilled for agriculture, the prairie white-fringed orchid was more common.
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Purple Coneflower
The purple coneflower is a beautiful summer/fall bloomer.
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Blooming purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) growing at a garden
Garden varieties have also been proven to pollinate with purple loosestrife and help it multiply.
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Red (Norway) pines
The red pine stands tall in the forest (80-120 feet) with a narrow trunk measuring only 2-3 feet in diameter.
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Milkweed Seeds
Seeds are on the move! Match the seed with the way it's dispersed.
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Shooting stars
Cranesbill, star shower, diamond-sparks—these are all names for this plant. Can you guess why?
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Prairie in Wisconsin
This Wisconsin prairie grass can be found in high prairies in southern Wisconsin to the north.
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Late winter snow on early spring skunk cabbage
Your first stop is near a swampy place.
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Knapweed close-up in field
Spotted knapweed secretes chemicals into the soil that kill surrounding plants.
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A Tamarack tree stands tall in it's fall dress of yellow with a dusting of snow on it's branches and needles
The tamarack is NOT an evergreen because an evergreen tree is one that is never totally without leaves.
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Sugar Maple Tree
The sugar maple was selected as the state tree by school children in a statewide vote in 1893.
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Eastern Red Cedar
Test how much you know about trees with this quiz!
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White Spruce
The white spruce reaches 60-80 feet with a wide crown (top).
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Leaves changing colors
While you were playing in the hot sun during summer vacation the trees on the streets, in the parks, and in the forests were working hard to keep you cool.
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Wild Parsnip in field
Warning: Steer Clear of This Invader—wild parsnip juice + ultraviolet light = burned skin
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Willow tree on white background
This is a large family of trees and shrubs that grow along streams and in other moist places.
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Tall oak tree in the spring
Armed with a flexible measuring tape and a ruler, big tree hunters are searching Wisconsin's cities and countryside for champion trees.
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Wood Anemone growing
You'll find this plant in dry to medium open woods and clearings.
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Close-up of a single Purple flowered Wild Violets (Viola papilionacea)
State flowers were first nominated in 1908.
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Yellow and green birch trees
Tell-tale smooth, peeling bark that looks like paper with small horizontal lines is a sure sign of a yellow birch.
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Yellow lotus in bloom
This beautiful wetland plant can be found throughout the Midwest and eastern United States.
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