Trees have importance culturally, economically, and historically. Get up-close and personal with the megaflora of our state.
Tree
Eastern Red Cedar
People use this tree for woodwork in their homes, hope chests, closets, for lead pencils, posts, and poles.
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A tree standing alone in a prairie
Nature has been a source of inspiration for artists throughout history.
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Paper Birch trees
In the winter, birch are also easy to identify by the dangling flower clusters in small bunches.
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Red (Norway) pines
The red pine stands tall in the forest (80-120 feet) with a narrow trunk measuring only 2-3 feet in diameter.
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A Tamarack tree stands tall in it's fall dress of yellow with a dusting of snow on it's branches and needles
The tamarack is NOT an evergreen because an evergreen tree is one that is never totally without leaves.
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Sugar Maple Tree
The sugar maple was selected as the state tree by school children in a statewide vote in 1893.
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White Spruce
The white spruce reaches 60-80 feet with a wide crown (top).
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Leaves changing colors
While you were playing in the hot sun during summer vacation the trees on the streets, in the parks, and in the forests were working hard to keep you cool.
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Willow tree on white background
This is a large family of trees and shrubs that grow along streams and in other moist places.
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Tall oak tree in the spring
Armed with a flexible measuring tape and a ruler, big tree hunters are searching Wisconsin's cities and countryside for champion trees.
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Yellow and green birch trees
Tell-tale smooth, peeling bark that looks like paper with small horizontal lines is a sure sign of a yellow birch.
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